HEMSLEY & HEMSLEY

the art of eating well. HEMSLEY & HEMSLEY is Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley. We are a London based family business for people who want to live healthier and more energised lives. We make whole, organic, nutrient filled, delicious homemade foods, free of grain, gluten, high starch and refined sugar. We want to share the food we love cooking and eating. This blog is all about food that changes the way we feel. Check out our new website www.hemsleyandhemsley.com

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The great MP

                               

A few months ago we watched Michael Pollan from the balcony of Conway Hall courtesy of The School of Life.

"…our diet has changed more in the last hundred years than in the last 10,000, probably, with the result that it is affecting our health."

image Michael is a legendary food writer and incredibly inspiring speaker. Check out his book ‘In Defence of Food’.

We’re currently reading Pollan’s newest book ‘Cooked’:

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"Cooking has the power to transform more than plants and animals.  It transforms us, too, from mere consumers into producers.  Not completely, not all the time, but I have found that even to shift the ratio between these two identities a few degrees toward the side of production yields deep and unexpected satisfactions."

Quinoa Tabbouleh - spoon & bowl supper

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It’s tabbouleh time again! This time last year we created a grain-free cauliflower tabbouleh to go with lamb meatballs - a really good example of food combining for optimum digestion.

Another nutritious substitute for the bulghar wheat is nutrient-dense, gluten-free quinoa - our store cupboard essential for meals like superfood saladquinoa risotto and our roasted veg and quinoa salad. 

Here the protein-packed quinoa, nourishing fat from olive oil and the addition of avocado makes this tabbouleh (usually a side dish or part of a mezze) a meal all on its own - perfect for a spoon and bowl supper:

http://www.vogue.co.uk/beauty/2013/08/02/hemsley-and-hemsley-quinoa-tabbouleh-recipe

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Electric Salad

Despite it’s less than exciting description on the menu, this made a delicious early evening snack shared with a friend at the Electric, Portobello.

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Coronation chicken

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Avoid the bread and sugar and eat more veg with our take on this classic for Guardian Cook supplement - one of the Ten Best Picnic Recipes:

Coronation chicken

A fresh, gluten-free and healthy way to enjoy glorious old-school coronation chicken. Free from refined sugar, thanks to naturally dark and rich, unsulphured, dried apricots and packed with superfoods: ginger, turmeric, yoghurt and almonds.

Makes 16

For the boats
4 medium chicken thighs 
4 black peppercorns
2 large garlic cloves, peeled
2 tsp ghee or coconut oil
2 medium onions, finely chopped
¼ tsp fresh ginger, chopped
1 tsp tomato puree
7 whole dried unsulphured apricots
4 tbsp full-fat probiotic yoghurt
¼ tsp fresh lemon juice 
1 small handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped (save a little for garnishing)
2 tbsp flaked almonds, toasted
6 baby gem lettuces, washed and dried 
Salt and black pepper

For the curry powder
3 tsp ground turmeric
1 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp ground coriander
¼ tsp fennel seeds
¼ tsp ground cinnamon
A pinch of ground cayenne

1 Poach the chicken thighs, peppercorns and garlic in a large pan just covered with water and simmer gently, lid on, for 18-20 minutes until cooked through. Remove the chicken and set aside to cool.

2 Heat the ghee in a frying pan and gently cook the onions for around 8 minutes until soft. Add the curry powder mix and fry for a further minute, stirring constantly.

Add the ginger, tomato puree and 3 tbsp water and simmer for a few minutes until most of the liquid evaporates. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

4 Blend 5 of the apricots with 4 tbsp water in a liquidiser to form a puree. Chop the remaining 2 apricots.

5 Dice the cooled chicken into small pieces and add to a large mixing bowl with the apricot puree, chopped apricots, yoghurt, lemon juice, coriander, cooled onion spice mix and half the almond flakes. Taste for seasoning, then refrigerate until ready.

6 To serve, spoon a tbsp of the chicken mix on to each lettuce leaf, and top with a pinch of the remaining almond flakes.

Recipe supplied hemsleyandhemsley.com

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Purdy 30

Celebrating 30 years with a chocolate orange birthday cake…

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Spices, algae and root vegetables colour the coconut and raw honey icing. Cacao hides the black beans hiding in the sponge!

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Blackforest Gateau inspired Cherry Trifle

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It’s a quick and easy, no-cook pud! Our super fast, superfood version of the German classic Blackforest Torte.

Fresh cherries, cacao, almond butter, raw honey, probiotic yoghurt - you can even use probiotic coconut yoghurt by Co Yo.

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Now’s the time to enjoy British cherries. We’ve got it on good authority that something good has come out of this unusually cold and bleak first half of the year.  Thanks to our fickle weather the cherries have developed more slowly, increasing the natural sweetness and texture of their flesh and producing an exceptional flavour.  

On top of that, 2013 is a bumper crop thanks to a new planting scheme using smaller trees which not only makes the cherries easier to harvest but also easier to protect from harsh winds and hungry birds - who enjoy them just as much as we do!

So take advantage of this affordable glut because these incredibly beautiful and valuable little fruits don’t grace the supermarket aisles or the greengrocers boxes for long - only popping up from mid June to the end of July. Support your farmers and buy British. For a touch of the ‘good life’ head out of town for the day and into the countryside. In Kent, Sussex and Herefordshire - the main cherry-growing counties of Britain - look out for pick-your-own farms and pop-up cherry stalls for a great value way to enjoy them and mark the summer by feasting on cherries picked by your own nifty fingers.

imageYou can also buy cherries shipped in from Europe – French cherries being the best choice but don’t bother searching the aisles in winter – these cherries will have been flown in from the southern hemisphere and lack the flavour and freshness of our homegrown crops, with up to 4 weeks of cold storage before they hit the shelves….minimum flavour that will cost a fortune.

http://www.vogue.co.uk/beauty/2013/07/26/hemsley-and-hemsley-raw-black-forest-cherry-trifle

Cherry oh, cherry oh baby

Cherries and reggae 1984

 

We love cherries

It is believed cultivated cherries were introduced to Britain in the first century AD. Legend has it that you can trace the route of old Roman Roads in Britain by looking out for wild cherry trees. Story tellers insist that Roman legions spat the stones from the fruit as they marched through Britain.

  • 100g of cherries provide 25% of the Recommended Daily Allowance of Vitamin C
  • Cherries are a rich food source of the hormone melatonin. Melatonin promotes healthy sleep patterns.
  • Powerful antioxidants called anthocyanins are found abundantly in cherries. Cherries are the richest source of anthocyanins 1 and 2, which give them their ruby colour.


Varieties grown in Britain that will be in stores over the next few weeks include:

  • Merchant is one of the earliest cherries to ripen. The fruit is large, sweet, and dark-red, with a good flavour.
  • Sunburst has large dark fruit, with a rich cherry flavour.
  • Stella is medium sized so good for smaller members of the family. The dark-red fruit is very sweet and juicy.
  • Skeena produces very large fruit with a good flavour.
  • Regina has large dark fruit that has a firm texture.
  • Kordia is a mid-season cherry that is medium-large in size, has firm flesh and a good flavour.
  •  Lapins starts the second half of the season and has large dark-red/black juicy fruits with dark flesh.
  • Colney is also a late season variety. A large, dark black fruit, of superb quality, that is very sweet.
  • Sweetheart as its name suggests, produces cherries that are predominantly sweet but they are not sugary to taste. Sweetheart ripens towards the end of the British cherry season.
  • Penny has outstanding quality and is the latest cherry to ripen. Penny is a black cherry that is large, firm and very sweet to eat.

FORAGING FOR SAMPHIRE

 

The lovely people at Riverford recently invited us down to visit the Orchington Farm estuary in beautiful Devon to pick samphire from the only certified crop of samphire in Britain. The samphire season is short–only July to August – and as we didn’t know much about this unique little plant we jumped at the opportunity to learn more!

 

Read on here and try our poached egg, samphire and harissa honey dressing recipe…

http://sousstyle.com/2013/07/23/foraging-for-samphire-in-the-british-countryside/

Best Birthday Wishes

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Chocolate and coconut, 4 layer sponge cake with a chocolate orange avocado filling and coconut cream icing coloured with paprika, beetroot, spirulina and turmeric.

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A nutritious and delicious way to celebrate - no: gluten, grains or refined sugars.

The word inspired means to be in spirit.

—Deepak Chopra, TED 2002